Mayors Gone Bad

Mayors Gone Bad

eBook - 2015
Average Rating:
2
Rate this:
Mayors Gone Bad , a series of profiles of recent and current Canadian mayors gone amok, is an entertaining companion volume to the bestselling Lawyers Gone Bad . Whether they've misappropriated funds, had cosy relationships with Mafia hoods, been caught with prostitutes, or admitted to smoking crack, Canada's mayors are a colourful collection: Peter Kelly, long-serving mayor of Halifax, driven from office by investigative reporting of ethical lapses; Gerard Tremblay of Montreal resigned in suspicious circumstances; Michael Applebaum of Montreal faces criminal charges of fraud; Gilles Vaillancourt of Laval also resigned and faces similar criminal charges; Alexandre Duplessis of Laval left after a hooker scandal; Joe Fontana was convicted of fraud and is under house arrest; Susan Fennell of Brampton was under police investigation for possible criminal use of city funds; Sam Katz of Winnipeg was dogged throughout his mayoralty by conflict-of-interest allegations; and Rob Ford made headlines across North America as "the crack-smoking mayor of Toronto." But it's not all bad news: Philip Slayton writes about the "western triangle of mayoral goodness," Nenshi of Calgary, Iveson of Edmonton, and Robertson of Vancouver. Also, Slayton features four foreign mayors who have made an impact: J#65533;n Gnarr of Reykjavik, Boris Johnson of London, Michael Bloomberg of New York, and Anne Hidalgo of Paris.

Aside from creating a rogues' gallery of mayors, Slayton offers insight into the nature of municipal government in Canada and speculates about why people seek the office of mayor. Little real power is exercised by any mayor, but the abuses of that power are nonetheless significant. As well, Slayton provides a series of proposals to reform municipal government. Written with the dry wit that made Lawyers Gone Bad a national bestseller, Slayton's new book is an eye-opening look at how we are governed.




From the Hardcover edition.
Publisher: New York :, Penguin Canada,, 2015
ISBN: 9780143194514
Branch Call Number: Online eBook
Characteristics: 1 online resource
text file, rda
Additional Contributors: OverDrive, Inc

Related Resources


Opinion

From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment

s
scooby55555
Jul 20, 2017

fORD WAS A GUY WHO MEANT WELL BUT HAD ISSUES WHICH AFFECTED HIM BUT WAS SADDLED WITH A COUNCIL OF EGOTISTS WHO DID NOT LIKE THE LOVE THE PEOPLE FROM ACROSS ONTARIO LOVED,,SO THE TORONTO COUNCIL AND THE STAR DID EVERYTHING POSSIBLE TO BURY HIM WHICH ONLY WORKED IN THE MEDIA HAS THE REGULAR JOE AND JANES LOVED HIM BECAUSE HE WAS,NT A MAYOR WHO WANTED THEIR EGOS PATTED FIRST SCREW THE REGULAR FOLK WHICH ARE THE REAL MIDDLE CLASS WHO MAKE 60K OR LESS,,MIDDLE CLASS ARE NOT MAKING 100 K AND UP DESPITE WHAT THE WYNNE,S AND TRUDEAU,S OF THE WORLD WITH HELP FROM THE MEDIA TELL US,,AFTER YOU GET BY THE FORD BASHING THE REST OF BOOK IS MOSTLY REHASHING WHAT MOST PEOPLE ALREADY KNOW,,SO TO THIS READER A WASTE OF MY TIME,,BUT IF YOU ARE A FORD BASHER THEN YES THIS BOOK FOR YOU

r
rpavlacic
Dec 03, 2015

If you thought the previous mayor of Toronto, Rob Ford, was bad ... he doesn't hold a candle to some of the other figures in this book. From questionable expenses and dubious superprojects to outright graft, Phillip Slayton presents a bleak outlook on the nature of municipal politics in Canada, including how two mayors in a row in both Montreal and Laval were tossed out on corruption allegations. Even legends like "Hurricane" Hazel McCallion aren't spared.

Comparisons are then drawn with the mayors of Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver who have pretty good records and solid reputations but are constrained by what they can do.

Finally, the author looks at the experience of Paris, London, New York City and Reykjavik and the problems those mayors have had.

Indeed, the author points out that the major problem facing cities - which if dealt with might reduce the temptation for malfeasance - is the lack of revenue tools that cities have in Canada. Unlike the US, cities here can't have a sales tax or income tax, they often can't keep revenues from traffic tickets, and they are limited in how much in bonds they can issue.

In short, the author says the simple solution would be to amend the constitution to recognize that cities have their own status, they are not merely creatures of the provinces. And that they have as much right to be at intergovernmental meetings as the provinces do.

Not a pleasant read, but an important one.

Age Suitability

Add Age Suitability

There are no age suitabilities for this title yet.

Summary

Add a Summary

There are no summaries for this title yet.

Notices

Add Notices

There are no notices for this title yet.

Quotes

Add a Quote

There are no quotes for this title yet.

Explore Further

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at PEPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top