Lord of the Abyss & Desert Warrior

Lord of the Abyss & Desert Warrior

eBook - 2011
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As the dark Lord who condemns souls to damnation in the Abyss, Micah is nothing but a feared monster. He has no idea he is the last heir of Elden. Only one woman knows--the daughter of his enemy. Liliana sees past his impenetrable black armor to the prince inside. To help Micah remember, she must brave his dark, dangerous lair. Because they only have until midnight to save Elden.
Publisher: Don Mills, Ontario : Harlequin Books, c2011
ISBN: 9781459282216
1459282213
Branch Call Number: Online eBook
Characteristics: 1 online resource
Additional Contributors: Singh, Nalini 1977-
OverDrive, Inc

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v
vloveg
Jul 18, 2012

Lord of the Abyss (5 stars) Nalini Singh is one of my favorites for a reason, and this book is an excellent example. There were a few times when I wanted to give up on the Royal House of Shadows series, but knowing she had written the last book kept me hanging on. I loved Micah and Liliana together! They both grew up under such extreme circumstances and managed to become strong and kind. It's always a nice switch for the hero to be a virgin, and especially with these two, I'm glad that they are each other's only lovers. Bard, Jissa, and even Mouse seemed very real and endearing. The mythical creatures came to life too, which doesn't always happen for me with other paranormal writers. /
There were a couple of consistency issues, but Singh seemed to make more of an effort to include elements from the others. I would have liked to have seen more of the siblings together. I don't know what Nicolai and Breena accomplished in the final battle (Dayn is excused, since he and Reda had to go after Moragh), but it's hard to imagine that two such strong warriors and magicians wouldn't have been useful against an opponent of the Blood Sorcerer's caliber. As much as I enjoyed this book, I probably would have enjoyed it as much or more if it wasn't part of a series. Perhaps that would be true of all the books in the series - my expectations are always higher when I know stories are supposed to connect. //
Desert Warrior (2 stars) It’s unusual that I despise a heroine, but Jasmine gets pretty close for the first half of the book. It’s not that I don’t sympathize with feelings of inadequacy or how things went down when they first met. I even understand why she went to Zulheil when she found out that Tariq’s parents had died, though I personally wouldn’t have done so without making other contact. What I don’t get is: how she could miss the blow his pride would have taken, the Stockholm Syndrome-like way she takes complete blame for the confusion from 4 years ago, her yo-yo-ing between hope and despair, and her desperate pleading with Tariq on emotional matters. No doubt, I would make a terrible heroine in a romance novel, but I’m embarrassed by her. I don’t usually consider myself one to blame the victim, but even when Tariq is being an asshole, I can’t help but feel Jasmine has brought it on herself. She did win back some points though with their argument on the phone. /
I don’t doubt that Tariq is a great leader and an admirable man, but he’s not exactly winning my heart either. I feel bad for him over how things went down in New Zealand, but it’s not like he couldn’t have handled things better either. How did everybody get the idea that he was brokenhearted before he even returned home? If it was that obvious in NZ, how could Jasmine have missed it? I know royalty/tycoon romances require some suspension of disbelief, but I think this one takes things too far. /
I’m a sap, so in the end, I was rooting for them. Those last few chapters were brutal though. It was interesting to see the difference between Desert Warrior (2003) and Lord of the Abyss (2011). Her writing is much improved.

v
vloveg
Jul 18, 2012

Lord of the Abyss (5 stars) Nalini Singh is one of my favorites for a reason, and this book is an excellent example. There were a few times when I wanted to give up on the Royal House of Shadows series, but knowing she had written the last book kept me hanging on. I loved Micah and Liliana together! They both grew up under such extreme circumstances and managed to become strong and kind. It's always a nice switch for the hero to be a virgin, and especially with these two, I'm glad that they are each other's only lovers. Bard, Jissa, and even Mouse seemed very real and endearing. The mythical creatures came to life too, which doesn't always happen for me with other paranormal writers. /
There were a couple of consistency issues, but Singh seemed to make more of an effort to include elements from the others. I would have liked to have seen more of the siblings together. I don't know what Nicolai and Breena accomplished in the final battle (Dayn is excused, since he and Reda had to go after Moragh), but it's hard to imagine that two such strong warriors and magicians wouldn't have been useful against an opponent of the Blood Sorcerer's caliber. As much as I enjoyed this book, I probably would have enjoyed it as much or more if it wasn't part of a series. Perhaps that would be true of all the books in the series - my expectations are always higher when I know stories are supposed to connect. //
Desert Warrior (2 stars) It’s unusual that I despise a heroine, but Jasmine gets pretty close for the first half of the book. It’s not that I don’t sympathize with feelings of inadequacy or how things went down when they first met. I even understand why she went to Zulheil when she found out that Tariq’s parents had died, though I personally wouldn’t have done so without making other contact. What I don’t get is: how she could miss the blow his pride would have taken, the Stockholm Syndrome-like way she takes complete blame for the confusion from 4 years ago, her yo-yo-ing between hope and despair, and her desperate pleading with Tariq on emotional matters. No doubt, I would make a terrible heroine in a romance novel, but I’m embarrassed by her. I don’t usually consider myself one to blame the victim, but even when Tariq is being an asshole, I can’t help but feel Jasmine has brought it on herself. She did win back some points though with their argument on the phone. /
I don’t doubt that Tariq is a great leader and an admirable man, but he’s not exactly winning my heart either. I feel bad for him over how things went down in New Zealand, but it’s not like he couldn’t have handled things better either. How did everybody get the idea that he was brokenhearted before he even returned home? If it was that obvious in NZ, how could Jasmine have missed it? I know royalty/tycoon romances require some suspension of disbelief, but I think this one takes things too far. /
I’m a sap, so in the end, I was rooting for them. Those last few chapters were brutal though. It was interesting to see the difference between Desert Warrior (2003) and Lord of the Abyss (2011). Her writing is much improved.

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v
vloveg
Jul 18, 2012

Lord of the Abyss - The Lord of the Abyss and the ruler of the Dark Castle has no memory before taking on that mantle. Twenty years ago he was Prince Micah, the youngest child of the King and Queen of Elden. One night the Blood Sorcerer took over the castle and murdered his parents. Their final act was to send their daughter and three sons to safety. Micah landed in the Dark Castle where, when he was old enough, he became Guardian of the Abyss: the realm where the wicked go after death. /
Liliana is the daughter of the Blood Sorcerer and the victim of his cruelty in countless ways. She had a vision foretelling that, if Micah is not found and brought back in time, the efforts of his siblings to defeat her father and reclaim Elden will fail. She needs to find out how much of his memory has been repressed, how his soul may have been distorted by his role or her father's curses, and whether he will trust her enough to get back to Elden - especially when he learns who she is. //
Desert Warrior - Four years ago, while studying irrigation techniques in New Zealand, Prince Tariq of Zulheil met and fell in love with Jasmine. At 18 years old, she was naïve, lacked self-confidence, and ultimately bowed to her family’s pressure to send the man she loved away. It was a six-month affair that left them both brokenhearted when he returned to his sheikdom. When Jasmine flies to Zulheil to comfort Tariq after his parents’ death, he goes a step beyond his promise to kidnap her and tricks her into marrying him within hours of landing. He intends to own her and keep her forever but refuses to trust her again with his heart.

v
vloveg
Jul 18, 2012

Lord of the Abyss - The Lord of the Abyss and the ruler of the Dark Castle has no memory before taking on that mantle. Twenty years ago he was Prince Micah, the youngest child of the King and Queen of Elden. One night the Blood Sorcerer took over the castle and murdered his parents. Their final act was to send their daughter and three sons to safety. Micah landed in the Dark Castle where, when he was old enough, he became Guardian of the Abyss: the realm where the wicked go after death. /
Liliana is the daughter of the Blood Sorcerer and the victim of his cruelty in countless ways. She had a vision foretelling that, if Micah is not found and brought back in time, the efforts of his siblings to defeat her father and reclaim Elden will fail. She needs to find out how much of his memory has been repressed, how his soul may have been distorted by his role or her father's curses, and whether he will trust her enough to get back to Elden - especially when he learns who she is. //
Desert Warrior - Four years ago, while studying irrigation techniques in New Zealand, Prince Tariq of Zulheil met and fell in love with Jasmine. At 18 years old, she was naïve, lacked self-confidence, and ultimately bowed to her family’s pressure to send the man she loved away. It was a six-month affair that left them both brokenhearted when he returned to his sheikdom. When Jasmine flies to Zulheil to comfort Tariq after his parents’ death, he goes a step beyond his promise to kidnap her and tricks her into marrying him within hours of landing. He intends to own her and keep her forever but refuses to trust her again with his heart.

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