A Tale of Two Cities

A Tale of Two Cities

Book - 1942
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Publisher: New York : Dodd, Mead, 1942
Branch Call Number: FIC Dicke 05
Characteristics: 353 p. :,ill

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a
amithv
Jul 14, 2020

When you learn about the French Revolution in your history class, teachers tend to gloss over the lives of the ordinary folk, instead focusing on the fleeting reigns of government officials, corrupt bureaucrats who were eventually executed, the almost successful escape of King Louis XVI, and the following Reign of Terror. However, A Tale of Two Cities follows the lives of Dr. Alexandre Manette, an imprisoned Parisian physician; Ernest Defarge, his former servant and a revolutionary; and Charles Darnay, a French emigre on trial for treason against Britain. The novel discusses the romantic relationship between Dr. Manette’s daughter, Lucie, and Darnay, as well as their relation to the ongoing conflict leading up to the French Revolution. A Tale of Two Cities gives readers a window into the lives of common Parisians, which is what made it such a well-known and impactful novel.

a
Anita_Dickey
May 22, 2020

I read this book to fulfill the goal read a book with a great first line. the best part of the book is the beginning line and the end. i did get a lot more out of it than when i read it in high school. like most of dicken's books it is a little slow going in places, but worth its classic status

b
briannabooks123
Mar 24, 2020

This book is quite different from any other novel I have read by Charles Dickens. Initially, when I started reading the book, I did not like it because I found the plot very dry and the events of the novel very confusing to comprehend. However, as I progressed, I became more emotionally invested with the characters and began to appreciate the way the plot effortlessly switches between the two cities of London and Paris. I didn't find any of the characters completely exceptional other than Mr. Manette and his shoemaking habits. The conclusion of the novel was very moving which is what ended up winning me over.

b
briannajacobs
Mar 24, 2020

I really enjoyed this book! Especially the second half of the novel. I found the first portion of the novel rather boring, I found my mind wandering which is usually not like me. However, as the plot progressed I was able to appreciate the plot and the way that Dickens effortlessly finds a way to switch between the settings of Paris, France and London, England. It was also a great way to learn about the uprisings and events that preceded the French Revolution. I really appreciated the end of the novel as well. It's different from the other books that Dickens wrote in his career but at the same time I found myself empathetic towards all characters. I honestly can't compare it to any other novels as it is completely unique, but the dynamic between some of the female characters remind me of Macbeth!

c
candlesticktroughs
Jan 16, 2020

my second favorite novel of dickens, it led me to read of the French Revolution, a really crazy time for the French. those who began as those sending others to the death machine, eventually ended up headless themselves. I hope this happens to the infernal democrats.

r
RebelBelle13
Jan 16, 2020

I can completely understand why this is considered a classic. It deals with harsh, dark, historical topics, and is loaded with symbolism- basically a literary professor's bread and butter. Even though I understood most of Dickens' language, I still read Barron's Book Notes side by side with this novel. I had no idea going into this that it was about the French Revolution- a topic that was still fresh in the minds of the English and French at the time of Dickens birth. Although he was not alive at the time of the Revolution, he paints a gruesome picture of the peasant mob mentality, the downfall of the Aristocrats and the ever-present Guillotine. Woven into this historical setting is the Manette and Evremonde familes- their sins, their sorrows, and their joys. If I was to nitpick (and let's be honest, I'm going to) I would say that this novel is too long in some sections and too short in others. The most exciting parts of the book (the last 50 pages or so) happen too quickly, and the middle section feels too drawn out. The character of Sydney Carton feels vastly unexplored; I want to know more about him then we get here. If I was to describe this to someone who had never heard of it, I would say it is reminiscent of Les Miserables, at a third of the length and zero singing. I'm excited to read more of Dickens in the future- I enjoy his writing style, his allegories and symbolism.

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blue_dog_17792
Jun 01, 2019

Not so good. It's interesting, though.

I read this book over a period of five weeks for school, and it made me really appreciate the story. The way Dickens sets up the plot and characters make you really feel for them. It is a beautiful love story that really depicts the horror that people can do when they've been oppressed. But the Unsympathetic English towards the Suffering French did throw me off a little, but it is a wonderful story and I can see why it's considered a classic novel.

m
mrsmeyer618
Oct 28, 2018

I had no idea how many "famous" and oft used quotes were from this book. I really enjoyed it even though book was a bit of a plod to get through.

j
jacekwalkowicz
Oct 15, 2018

bravery +++

This one is the total classic adventure.

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Age Suitability

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b
blue_dog_8329
Aug 25, 2019

blue_dog_8329 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

b
blue_dog_17792
May 28, 2019

blue_dog_17792 thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

c
christinajenkins4
May 30, 2015

christinajenkins4 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

e
Expectations
Dec 21, 2014

Expectations thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

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NaomiYoshi
Nov 25, 2014

NaomiYoshi thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 99 and 99

v
VampireHunterD
Nov 24, 2012

VampireHunterD thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

EuSei Nov 09, 2012

EuSei thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

é
étoile
Mar 27, 2011

étoile thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

p
pie
Jun 25, 2008

pie thinks this title is suitable for All Ages

Quotes

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Mr Lorry asks the witness questions:

Ever been kicked?
Might have been.
Frequently?
No.
Ever kicked down stairs?
Decidedly not; once received a kick at the top of a staircase, and fell down stairs of his own accord.”

r
Rainman
Jan 09, 2015

Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death;--the last, much the easiest to bestow, O Guillotine!

r
Rainman
Jan 09, 2015

Then tell Wind and Fire where to stop, but don't tell me.

e
EKOrr
May 21, 2014

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..."

v
VampireHunterD
Nov 24, 2012

“All through it, I have known myself to be quite undeserving. And yet I have had the weakness, and have still the weakness, to wish you to know with what a sudden mastery you kindled me, heap of ashes that I am, into fire- a fire, however, inseparable in its nature from myself, quickening nothing, lighting nothing, doing no service, idly burning away.”
― Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities

é
étoile
Mar 27, 2011

"It is a far, far better thing that I do than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known." - Sydney Carton

p
pie
Jun 25, 2008

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times; it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness; it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity; it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness; it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair; we had everything before us, we had nothing before us; we were all going directly to Heaven, we were all going the other way.

p
pie
Jun 25, 2008

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times; it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness; it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity; it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness; it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair; we had everything before us, we had nothing before us; we were all going directly to Heaven, we were all going the other way.

p
pod
Mar 22, 2008

They were the best of times. They were the worst of times.

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